Z-Track Method

by Cathy Parkes December 20, 2019 Updated: December 29, 2021

Z-Track Method

When administering iron dextran via IM injection, use the Z-track method!

What is the Z-Track Method?

The z track method is the process of putting medications into muscle tissue without allowing for them to leak/track back into subcutaneous tissue that lays over the muscle. It is given the “z” name because when conducting this method, the skin and tissue is required to be pulled prior to inserting the syringe causing the needle track to take the shape of a z.

Why Use the Z-Track Method

The z method is not a common method but has proven to be useful when wanting to administer medication that needs to be absorbed by muscle in order to effectively work. And because this method helps prevent the leakage of medication it can help ensure that a full dosage is received.

When to Use Z-Track Method?

The z track method is only really recommended for specific medications, such as iron dextran, when performing intramuscular injections (I.M.) on adults. This is because it helps ensure that the medication is reaching the right muscle and not leaking into other tissue.

What is the Purpose of the Z Track Method?

The purpose of the z track method is to allow for a full dosage of medication to reach the desired tissue without leaking into other tissue and causing irritation.



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