Mixing insulin

by Cathy Parkes February 19, 2021 Updated: December 29, 2021

When mixing insulin, remember CLEAR before CLOUDY. Inject air in longer-acting insulin, then inject air in shorter-acting insulin. Without withdrawing needle, draw up shorter-acting insulin, then draw up longer-acting insulin.

When mixing insulin, remember CLEAR before CLOUDY. Inject air in the longer-acting insulin (NPH), then inject air in the shorter-acting insulin (regular). Without withdrawing needle, draw up shorter-acting insulin, then draw up longer-acting insulin.

Check out our in-depth article on insulin medications. These medications are covered in our Pharmacology Flashcards for Nursing Students.

Which Insulins Can Be Mixed Together?

It is important to know that not all insulins can be mixed, and the ones that can need to be mixed correctly. Novolog (Lispro) and Humalog (Aspart), rapid acting insulin, can all be mixed with NPH. However, they must be provided by the same manufacturer and need to be administered within 15 minutes after mixing. You can also mix regular (short acting) insulin and NPH. Keep in mind that Glargine (Lantus) can not be mixed with any other insulin.



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